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newsweek:

In an unlikely corner of our solar system, scientists have discovered evidence of what they believe is a subterranean ocean. The water means a tiny moon orbiting Saturn could be one of the few places in the solar system with the right ingredients for life.
The moon Enceladus is only 300 miles wide—it would fit between New York City and Charlottesville, Va. It’s a mini-world with a bright, icy, frigid surface, and it is just one of an astounding 62 moons orbiting the ringed planet. But it is not just a static, boring ice ball. Fractures on the moon’s surface—evocatively named “tiger stripes”—emit jets of frozen water that help form one of the bands in Saturn’s rings.
Ocean as Large as Lake Superior Found on Enceladus, a Tiny Moon Orbiting Saturn

newsweek:

In an unlikely corner of our solar system, scientists have discovered evidence of what they believe is a subterranean ocean. The water means a tiny moon orbiting Saturn could be one of the few places in the solar system with the right ingredients for life.

The moon Enceladus is only 300 miles wide—it would fit between New York City and Charlottesville, Va. It’s a mini-world with a bright, icy, frigid surface, and it is just one of an astounding 62 moons orbiting the ringed planet. But it is not just a static, boring ice ball. Fractures on the moon’s surface—evocatively named “tiger stripes”—emit jets of frozen water that help form one of the bands in Saturn’s rings.

Ocean as Large as Lake Superior Found on Enceladus, a Tiny Moon Orbiting Saturn

newsweek:

The thing is, all of that ice takes a long time to melt. As of April 10, 48 percent of the five lakes’ 90,000-plus square miles were still covered in ice, down from a high of 92.2 percent on March 6 (note that constituted the highest levels recorded since 1979, when ice covered 94.7 percent of the lakes). Last year, only 38.4 percent of the lakes froze over, while in 2012 just 12.9 percent did – part of a four-year stint of below-average iciness.
And as the Great Lakes slowly lose their historically large ice covers over the next few months, the domino effects could include lingering cold water, delayed seasonal shifts, and huge jumps in water levels.
Why It’s a Big Deal That Half of the Great Lakes Are Still Covered in Ice

newsweek:

The thing is, all of that ice takes a long time to melt. As of April 10, 48 percent of the five lakes’ 90,000-plus square miles were still covered in ice, down from a high of 92.2 percent on March 6 (note that constituted the highest levels recorded since 1979, when ice covered 94.7 percent of the lakes). Last year, only 38.4 percent of the lakes froze over, while in 2012 just 12.9 percent did – part of a four-year stint of below-average iciness.

And as the Great Lakes slowly lose their historically large ice covers over the next few months, the domino effects could include lingering cold water, delayed seasonal shifts, and huge jumps in water levels.

Why It’s a Big Deal That Half of the Great Lakes Are Still Covered in Ice

"Plants, after all, are the reigning global masters of clean energy. They use 100 percent solar power: The chloroplast, the so-called "powerhouse" of a plant cell, is a "3 billion-year-old solar energy collector" and a "sub-microscopic solar battery," as Tyson put it. Basically, chloroplasts use sunlight, carbon dioxide, and water to store energy in sugars, and give off oxygen as a by-product. And without this fundamental green energy technology, life on this planet as we know it wouldn’t exist."

~~Swoon~~

sagansense:

Earth’s upper atmosphere—below freezing, nearly without oxygen, flooded by UV radiation—is no place to live. But last winter, scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology discovered that billions of bacteria actually thrive up there.

Expecting only a smattering of microorganisms, the researchers flew six miles above Earth’s surface in a NASA jet plane. There, they pumped outside air through a filter to collect particles.

Back on the ground, they tallied the organisms, and the count was staggering: 20 percent of what they had assumed to be just dust or other particles was alive. Earth, it seems, is surrounded by a bubble of bacteria.
Now what? Read the whole story over at PopSci…

sagansense:

Earth’s upper atmosphere—below freezing, nearly without oxygen, flooded by UV radiation—is no place to live. But last winter, scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology discovered that billions of bacteria actually thrive up there.

image

Expecting only a smattering of microorganisms, the researchers flew six miles above Earth’s surface in a NASA jet plane. There, they pumped outside air through a filter to collect particles.

image

Back on the ground, they tallied the organisms, and the count was staggering: 20 percent of what they had assumed to be just dust or other particles was alive. Earth, it seems, is surrounded by a bubble of bacteria.

imageNow what? Read the whole story over at PopSci

(via thecraftychemist)

mothernaturenetwork:

5 places already feeling the effects of climate changeClimate change forecasts tend to focus on how the world will look in a century, but some places need evaluation now.

NOTE: These are not the only places, by far, that are already feeling the effects of climate change. 

mothernaturenetwork:

5 places already feeling the effects of climate change
Climate change forecasts tend to focus on how the world will look in a century, but some places need evaluation now.

NOTE: These are not the only places, by far, that are already feeling the effects of climate change. 


Something to read whenever you feel bad about yourself

Something to read whenever you feel bad about yourself

(Source: humortrain, via kumaton)

lokiel-fallen-god:

celesgami:

idpmirtf:

rearadmiral-comsmocock:

can we just take a moment to realize that not only did it paint an elephant it painted it to give the illusion of depth

I love elephants more than anything

#1: read this
#2: stop reblogging this 
please

we need to keep reblogging so people see your comment and know

lokiel-fallen-god:

celesgami:

idpmirtf:

rearadmiral-comsmocock:

can we just take a moment to realize that not only did it paint an elephant it painted it to give the illusion of depth

I love elephants more than anything

#1: read this

#2: stop reblogging this 

please

we need to keep reblogging so people see your comment and know

(Source: ForGIFs.com, via pheonixwings394)

elegantbuffalo:

Why Global Warming Will Cross A Dangerous Threshold in 2036
If the world continues to burn fossil fuels at the current rate, global warming will rise 2 degrees Celsius by 2036, crossing a threshold that many scientists think will hurt all aspects of human civilization: food, water, health, energy, economy and national security.
Full article here.
Bummer.

elegantbuffalo:

Why Global Warming Will Cross A Dangerous Threshold in 2036

If the world continues to burn fossil fuels at the current rate, global warming will rise 2 degrees Celsius by 2036, crossing a threshold that many scientists think will hurt all aspects of human civilization: food, water, health, energy, economy and national security.

Full article here.

Bummer.

(via jennitals)